Patrol

The Mission of the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Patrol Division is to protect life and property and maintain peace and order through the vigilant enforcement of the law, and the relentless effort to bring to justice those who prey upon the innocent, while demonstrating the highest level of Courage, Honor, Integrity and Professionalism.

Patrol Division deputies provide quality law enforcement services 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to the residents of unincorporated Douglas County, the City of Castle Pines and the Town of Larkspur.

The larger communities like Highlands Ranch, Roxborough, Castle Pines, The Pinery and Stonegate generate a large portion of the calls for service. There are about 1,131 miles of roadway to patrol. 86% of Douglas County’s population lives in the upper north 13% of the landmass of the northern border of the county which encompasses Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Approximately 73% of the population lives in unincorporated areas of the county. The 844 square miles of the county is divided up into 10 districts. District 8 is a very large district geographically of approximately 243 square miles, which, incorporates the Pike National Forest and the private residences including private land surrounded by the forest, and is patrolled by two resident deputies and a sergeant.

Members of Patrol Division strive to control crime and improve quality of life issues in our community.  In 2011 Patrol deputies responded to 47,951 citizen initiated calls for service in unincorporated Douglas County. This is a 2% increase over 2010 calls for service. The Patrol Division enforces Colorado Revised Statutes, (C.R.S.) and County OrdinancesEnacted by the Board of County Commissioners.

Community Oriented Policing

Members of the Patrol Division are committed to the process of Community Oriented Policing (C.O.P.) Patrol lieutenants, also called “Watch Commanders” are responsible for ensuring that effective methods of community policing and quality of life strategies are initiated on their assigned shifts. Watch Commanders are responsible for rapidly deploying Sheriff’s Office personnel and resources to alleviate crime patterns and to improve quality of life in our community.

Problem Oriented Policing

The Patrol Division is in the process of implementing technology to assist in crime analysis through its reporting techniques that will assist in the solving of crime. This new reporting system will also assist in Problem Oriented Policing (P.O.P) identification. Problem Oriented Policing is a separate concept of policing the problem areas by increasing Patrol Division manpower to solve a specific crime by apprehending the criminals or by increasing our presence while looking for a specific criminal activity in an identified geographical area in an attempt to apprehend the suspected criminals. A problem is identified as something that concerns or causes harm to citizens, not just the police. Things that concern only police officers are important, but they are not problems in this sense of the term. Deputies are issued manuals to assist in problem solving that contain problem-solving worksheets called a S.A.R.A. Model.

Community Oriented Policing and Problem Oriented Policing Concepts Teamed Together

Community Oriented Policing is not a special program or unit, but a universal philosophy, which brings our community together. It is combined with Problem Oriented Policing as a proactive problem solving approach to law enforcement intended to increase the quality of life for citizens in the community by reducing crime. C.O.P. is accomplished by providing community based law enforcement services through the application of proactive and preventive enforcement strategies derived from partnerships within the community. C.O.P. relies on involvement of the community to assist us in calling us when they feel that a possible crime has or is about to be committed. It promotes the building of trusting relationships between the law enforcement officers and the community they serve. This helps to solve the problems that cause crime by working with agencies, organizations, businesses, and the citizens within the community to identify problems, which may not be readily apparent to the law enforcement officer.

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Additional Resources

Douglas County Sheriff

Justice Center

4000 Justice Way
Castle Rock, CO 80109
Phone: 303.660.7505

Office Hours

Monday through Friday
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.


Highlands Ranch Substation

9250 Zotos Drive
Highlands Ranch, CO 80129
Phone: 303.784.7800

Office Hours

Monday through Friday
7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.


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